LSU in the News

 

WSJ: Cold Pursuits: A Scientist's Quest to Uncover Antarctica's Secrets

For three decades scientist Peter Doran has collected environmental data in Antarctica. This year he is leading a project that uses aerial sensors to probe beneath the surface of vast glaciers.

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Pacific Standard: How to Increase Trust in the Media

Some journalists are reluctant to speak up in defense of their profession. One school of thought argues that responding to attacks from President Donald Trump, who regularly calls the media "the enemy of the people," risks making reporters look like advocates. Better, they argue, just to do good work.

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Live Science: How This Supercolony of 1.5 Million Penguins Stayed Hidden for Nearly 3,000 Years

This year, scientists announced an incredible discovery by looking at poop stains in satellite images — 1.5 million Adélie penguins were living and thriving on a little patch in Antarctica surrounded by treacherous sea ice called the Danger Islands.

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EOS: Penguin Poop Keeps a Record of Antarctic Glaciation

Ice cores, sediment samples, and tree rings are commonly consulted for the history of the planet’s climate. But the Antarctic, it turns out, has another climate record.

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CNN: The top space stories of 2018

This year was full of discovery throughout the cosmos.

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News Medical: Spaceflight does not compromise major part of the immune system, shows research

With a new crew arriving at the International Space Station, astronauts will be relieved to know that they won't have to worry about a major aspect of their immune system being compromised. While researchers know a lot about astronauts' skeletal and muscular health during spaceflight and when they return to Earth, much less is known about how spaceflight affects immunity. It has been generally thought, until now, that spaceflight has a detrimental impact on all aspects of the immune system.

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Discover: Four New Gravitational Wave Detections Announced, Including Most Massive Event Yet

Scientists have announced the detection of four new gravitational waves, bringing the total to 11. First captured by the LIGO detectors in 2015, the new observations of ripples in the fabric of space-time are quickly adding up and helping researchers to better understand powerful and distant cosmic phenomena like black holes and neutron stars.

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