LSU in the News

 

New York Times: She Runs Marathons and Sings Opera. And She Just Won $50,000.

The bright-voiced American soprano Lisette Oropesa — who is known for singing bel canto onstage and running marathons offstage — has been awarded the prestigious Richard Tucker Award, the prize’s administrators announced on Monday.

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The Kathmandu Post: Meet the Nepali researcher who led the team that discovered a new species of bird

In Borneo rainforest, the largest island in Asia that is politically divided between three Southeast Asian countries Malaysia, Brunei and Indonesia, lives a white-eyed Cream-vented Bulbul or Pycnonotus pseudosimplex. Earlier this year, a team of researchers from Louisiana State University led by Subir B Shakya discovered the new species of bird, found in the Sundaic islands.

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The Hechinger Report: For state schools, diversity isn’t just about fairness. It’s about the bottom line.

Louisiana’s flagship public university has a checkered past on integration. But some new faces are working to turn the tide and help students of color find a home.

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Cosmos: Table-top LIGO illustrates quantum breakthrough in gravitational wave hunt

new physical device makes it possible to observe – and hear – quantum effects at room temperature, a breakthrough that could help the search for gravitational waves.

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New Yorker: Louisiana's Disappearing Coast

The New Orleans Lakefront Airport was built by the Louisiana governor Huey P. Long on a tongue of fill that sticks out into Lake Pontchartrain. Its terminal was designed by the same architect Long had used to build a new Louisiana state capitol and a new governor’s mansion, and it was originally named for one of Long’s cronies, Abraham Shushan. Within eighteen months of the airport’s opening, in 1934, Shushan had been indicted for money laundering and Long had been murdered. A few years later, the architect, too, went to prison.

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Smithsonian: How Much Electricity Can Thunderstorms Produce?

Michael Cherry, a cosmic and gamma-ray researcher at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge tells Rini at Physics that the muon-detecting technique is a good start, but that it relies on some simplified models of storms to derive its calculations. In the future, he says, sending drones or balloons into storms in combination with the muon detector could help refine the readings. Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/cosmic-ray-detector-measures-13-billion-volt-thunderstorm-180971787/#GB8f3k27QfYziiC5.99 Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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NPR: Massive U.S. Machines That Hunt For Ripples In Space-Time Just Got An Upgrade

Scientists are about to restart the two giant facilities in the United States that register gravitational waves, the ripples in the very fabric of the universe that were predicted by Albert Einstein more than a century ago.

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